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  1. #1
    Senior Member Andrew Robinson's Avatar
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    The One True Universal Format Is...

    Originally published on Andrew-Robinson-Online.com

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    I want you to picture the last really good movie you saw. I don’t care where, or how long ago it was, just the last film that struck a chord with you beyond the superficial. I want you to put that in your mind. Now, still thinking of that film, at any time were you at all concerned with whether or not it (the film) was brought to you in HD or 4K? 3D or 2D? 48fps or 24? Home or theater? If you’re honest with yourself, chances are the answer is no, you were not concerned with the technical as the film itself had your full attention. Now, how often does that happen? If you’re at all like me, not very often, as fewer and fewer films are hardly what I’d describe as captivating anymore. As a writer and a filmmaker I see this void as a personal challenge, but as a home theater enthusiast it means there is a hole that I must now fill with “stuff”. Enter the often daunting and seemingly never ending conversation surrounding gear, technology and the like.

    It’s not that I dislike what I do, I love it actually, but there does come a point where we start to focus on the wrong things. For example, 4K. As you’ve no doubt noticed by now, I’ve been talking a lot about 4K lately. I have because it is a topic that is on a lot of enthusiasts’ minds, though admittedly general consumers, I believe, could care less. The 4K conversation has been great thus far, and I’ve enjoyed the back and forth with regards to its pending arrival on the scene. But just this morning I began to wonder something with regards to 4K. For all the problems it will eventually “solve” will it actually manage to “fix” the biggest issue facing viewers?

    Content.

    Many a 4K advocate have said...

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  2. #2
    Senior Member David Vaughn's Avatar
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    Totally agree Andrew. Crap is 4K is just as bad as crap in 2K, it just has more detail. Same thing with 3D...the movie has to be good first, then the technology may make it better...it's not the other way around.
    David Vaughn
    Technical Writer/Blu-ray Reviewer
    Sound and Vision Magazine

  3. #3
    Member chaluga's Avatar
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    Ill agree about movies , lots of crap... just watched skyfall
    Last night at home and it was pretty good. Tv however has lots of good shows right now. Homeland , southland , Dexter , house of lies , game of thrones
    Banshee , suits , to name a few I like. To find good movies you need to watch smaller releases sometimes .

  4. #4
    Senior Member k0rww's Avatar
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    Movies have been rushed out to show case special effects that are wrapped around poorly written storylines. Well written stories are in short supply and I don't see this trend turning around.Hopefully this is just a phase.
    Richard

  5. #5
    Senior Member David Vaughn's Avatar
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    Sadly, a lot of good movies don't make a profit. The costs of production have gone through the roof and if the film isn't a blockbuster then they generally lose money.
    David Vaughn
    Technical Writer/Blu-ray Reviewer
    Sound and Vision Magazine

  6. #6
    Senior Member Andrew Robinson's Avatar
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    Even many of the so-called blockbusters loose money. For the stated budget is never the REAL budget. I know this is a bad example but films like Harry Potter (which obviously have made a profit and then some) had 100 million plus dollar production budgets but comparable marketing ones too -in some instances more than half! In truth a film typically has to make 3x or more its production budget before it's "profitable". It's insane really.

  7. #7
    Senior Member David Vaughn's Avatar
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    That's why a movie such as The Hangover was such a success for Warner. It's productions costs were small (relatively speaking) at $35 million and it's box office rake was over $275 million! Now there's a good ROI. Sadly, there's only a few "very good" movies that come out every year. The rest range from passable to outright horrible (the majority).
    David Vaughn
    Technical Writer/Blu-ray Reviewer
    Sound and Vision Magazine

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