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  1. #1
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    Unhappy Wireless HDMI Transmitter/ Receivers

    We currently have a customer that is in need of wireless HDMI. We have a flat screen on the wall in the living room. The related equipment is in a glass front low boy cabinet within the same room approx 15- 20 feet away. (no blockages in between). The complication is that they live in a 6 story condo building. There are numerous wireless HDMI units out there from Actiontec, Bright View, Key Digital, AVIOR, Atlona, etc. They do not all work the same; some use 80211g, some use 2.4 Ghz, etc. We need it to work for 2 HDMI's (Blu Ray & HD Cable Box). If we were to use one that is on 2.4 Ghz, there might be any number of people living there with 2.4 Ghz phones that could present a problem. Also, many of these wireless HDMI units use compressed, rather then uncompressed transmission. Obviously, uncompressed would be better. Can anyone comment on this type of situation? It would be appreciated. Thank you.
    PS. Since there is no carpet in the room, no access to a floor above or below, this is really our only option.

  2. #2


    I have ZERO experience with wireless HDMI. Is there no way to run a flat HDMI cable under the floor molding, if there was any?

    Either that or CAT5 with adapters.

  3. #3
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    Tracy: I gave all the options to the customer. They don't want to see any wires showing. These are hardwood floors. Also, no access from the floor above or below. We could have moved the tv to a. Different wall. They also did'nt want that. I suggested white rectangular moulding. They also don't want that either. The only option that they would agree to is wireless. Hdmi. I have done these before. Sometimes it works great and sometimes there are problems. It depends on certain variables. What is the distance? Is there any walls or blockage between the transmitter & receiver? Is there any interference from nearby. These can be different in every different situation. I would prefer not tuse 2.4 ghz or 900 MHz, since this is a condo building and many people could have cordless phones that are on the same frequencies. 80211g would probably work better in this circumstance.

  4. #4


    I understand working with the end user, just not with AV.

    My mention about floor molding was this. In our home office, I had to run some CAT5 across the room and didn't want to drill and/or cut more holes in walls or floors. I was able to squeeze the cables under the taller baseboard molding, before reinstalling the "shoe molding".

    Sorry that I am no help with the wireless HDMI.

  5. #5
    Senior Member David Vaughn's Avatar
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    Jeff,

    I wrote an article about three different options earlier this year. Here's the link: Air Def TV | Home Theater

    Best,
    David Vaughn
    Technical Writer/Blu-ray Reviewer
    Sound and Vision Magazine

  6. #6


    Thanks David, hopefully it will help Jeffrey out. Let us know what you finally do and how it works out.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Vaughn View Post
    Jeff,

    I wrote an article about three different options earlier this year. Here's the link: Air Def TV | Home Theater

    Best,
    David: Thank you so much for your reply and the article which you wrote. In 2003, when HDMI was released, it was version 1.0. As with any & every electronic invention; reinvention, things are constantly changing, being improved, etc. We are currently (9 years later) up to version 1.4a. As David mentioned, some of these changes added the ARC, improvements for 3D TV as well. One of the problems with HDMI is the ever present "Handshake" issue. Those of us dealing with this as a Pro know that the Handshake issue rears it's ugly little head from time to time. This has to do with the signal going forward to the display, and the "talk back" in the opposite direction. The handshake must occur or there are problems. In some instances,we use HDMI Balun systems, which use Cat 5e wire; sometimes dual or siamese Cat 5e, and sometimes Cat 6, depending on which company happened to have manufactured the HDMI Balun system. We have used these in commercial jobs where the cable lengths generally exceed 50', and some go to 100' and beyond. From my experience, this type of system has worked very well. Unfortunately, with my customer's current situation, this is not an option (for obvious reasons). DVI-D was mainly doomed because of the size of the connector (it did not lend itself well to custom installation). HDMI mini cables are now in use, but mainly for miniturized components such as camcorders. As like most everything else, HDMI technology will continue to evolve. If you don't like change, don't get into this business. What I would like to see is that a standard for wireless HDMI be adopted as soon as possible. David has made it perfectly clear in his article how technology varies from manufacturer to manufacturer. Some are now using 802.11g, others are using 2.4 ( a crowded bandwith), etc. Right now, it would be nice if we could review each & every wireless HDMI Transmitters & Reciever out there and compare the effectiveness of each & every one of them. Throughout the development of various technologies, companies produced many varying systems that were incompatible. A battle ensued, and eventually, someone won out. The earliest example of this was Quad sound from the 1970's. There were many Quad systems developed including SQ, QS, Cd-4, RM, etc. Another example from a long time ago was VHS vs. Beta. That was also a long drawn out battle. Eventually, VHS won that war, but for the wrong reason. Americans chose VHS since it offered up to 8 hours of recording vs. 5 hours for Beta. Beta was the superior system yet it lost. Obviously, the manufacturers have learned nothing from these rediculous battles of the past.

  8. #8


    My wireless HDMIs

    Hi Jeff,
    I have used the Brite-View for the last 4 years and it works great. The transmitter is in one room with the receiver in the next room. Approx. 25 feet in distance.
    Amazon.com: brite-View Air SyncHD (BV-2322) Uncompressed 1080p Video/ Audio Wireless Transmission Kit: Electronics

    I also bought a Belkin this summer. It also works great at a 25 foot distance going thru a concrete wall or sliding glass door (depending on where I roll the TV outside).
    Amazon.com: Belkin ScreenCast AV4 - Clutter Removing 4 Port Wireless HDMI Adapter for HDTV / Game Consoles / Blu-ray / HDMI enabled Laptops, Desktops and other HDMI Compatable Electronics: Electronics

    I don't know why I didn't just get a second Brite-View. Both work great with no audio-sync issues.
    Two more things, the 1st Belkin I received did not work - no signal at all. Returned it thru Amazon & 2nd one has been working for several months now.
    Second, The Brite-View would only transmit my Playstation at 1080i. Seems to be a known issue. From the PC & Blu-Ray, no issues sending 1080p.

    Chris
    Last edited by cdsinfla; 08-28-2012 at 06:47 PM.

  9. #9
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    Thanks Chris. But I already processed all the different units and I ordered the IOGEAR GW3DHDKIT Wireless. I had to get it in ASAP. The IOGEAR has the following: 1. It sets up a private wireless network that no one else can view. It sends 2 HDMI sources. You can either turn on the source you want (Blu Ray or HD CATV BOX) and it selects the unit that is on. 3. It also comes with a Remote that can switch between the 2 sources. I only need it to work from 20' away (no blockages. The price isn't bad either. It can also send the sources to other TV's not too far away. I'll let you know how it performs once we install it. Thanks

  10. #10
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    Sorry, I forgot to post the results with the wireless HDMI. We used the IOGEAR. It worked out phenominally well. THe unit sets up very easily. It sends dual HDMI. It will alsoi send IR commands; emmitters comes with it. It works by setting up a wireless network that no one can access. The picture on the Samsung 46" LED Smart TV was georgeous. Worked absoilutely flawlessly. No glitches. It can also send the signal to another TV as well. How can you beat that? I would not hesitate to use it again. Just perfect. WOW!

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