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  1. #1
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    I sold off the Golden Ear Triton system, and moved onto (gulp) Klipsch (more).

    ... Palladium P37's with matching center and bookshelves as rears.

    So I suppose more I'll provide a bit more explanation.

    So, while many of my early posts on the Triton's were almost newbie like in nature it was really just a manifestation of frustration. I used to really be into 2 channel audio. I know how to set up a room and I know the sound I'm after. I was out of my mind when I got them home. They are very particular to set-up.

    Growing up on Klipsch and listening to rock I admit I like a lively speaker but finding one that wasn't bright is SO tough. The palladium's on the other hand, this is what I was after. They are smoother than the Paradigm stuff I find but still tight, oh so tight and snappy. Now, they actually don't have the low end of the RF7 II's, I believe for me they are best with a sub thus far (using my old velodyne SPL series), but a new sub will be my next purchase.

    So some thoughts on the Triton's and this is just one man's opinion.

    I liked them enough to buy them and drop some serious cash so what happened?

    First of all - As a two channel speaker, sitting in the sweet spot they are a good speaker for the money. The powered subs add nice bass, they image like no tomorrow, and they are not harsh. They can be played loudly without fatigue for sure. They do these things very well and for 3k it's great. I also think this is why the reviews are excellent. In that specific situation and for the money they do a lot of things very well. Most reviewers set things up for that situation. I found though when I moved over even one seat they really changed, much more so than other speakers.

    I wanted the midrange to be more forward, but I'm a rock guy and I want my guitar's crunching.

    The Aon's put out a ton of bass for little bookshelves and are very nice for sub 1k.

    The center channel - it's simply not up to snuff for the system. Sorry, the 60c is likely great as a wall mounted center, likely fantastic. But it doesn't keep up with the Triton 2's in my opinion. I bought it without listening, assuming it would but it doesn't. GE needs to build a bigger center.

    Powered subs... so this is a good and bad situation. If you have a room without the space for a dedicated sub, the Triton's are very nice. But be aware, if you want them to play low and shake things during movies you need to crank them up and if you have a musical passage during said movie - they will be boomy and loose. Or if you set them up for music well - they don't rumble during movies. Say during Iron Man 2 - where you have a great soundtrack and explosions you can get them sounding great for one or the other.

    I'm still playing with the Palladium system and for me, thus far I'm pretty happy thus far. Granted they are 2x the cost (retail).

    I don't want to "rip" the Triton 2 system. I think it's a nice sounding loudspeaker, but I'm going to counter the effusive reviews that are out there everywhere and say yes, it's a good speaker but that one should be aware of some of the limitations. My biggest caveat though would be to really think about that center channel. It's a nice center - for what it is - a wall mounted center. I also think for true home theater, unless your room is real small that a dedicated sub is going to be wanted by most users..

    I think the real gem of the Golden Ear line-up actually is the Aon 3. I think a heck of a little system could be 3 aon 3's across the front, two aon 2's in the rear and a ForceField sub if one wanted to stay with one company.

    So, now I need to decide what to do sub wise. Almost picked up a duplicate SPL 12 on ebay today and was just going to run two of those to smooth out bass response.

    But my neighbor just picked up a Paradigm Sub 12... man that thing hits low and tight!

  2. #2
    Administrator Tracy Rainwater's Avatar
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    To me, speakers are the hardest thing to shop for. Everyone perceives sound differently, making our personal tastes highly subjective, to say the least. You also have to take into consideration the fact that your room and placement play a HUGE part of how the speakers perform. Bottom line, they will sound different when you take them home, than they did in some dealer's demo room.

    I agree with you about the Golden Ear center, It really doesn't seem to be matched to the same specs as the Triton's. Eric at Tekton Design, knows how to make a matched center. It's essentially a shorter version of his Pendragon towers, without the extra baffle. Granted, it's HUGE.

    Good to hear that you have finally have a setup that you love. You should post photos and more details of your system in the Member's Theater Forum. I would love to see your system.

  3. #3
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    In my experience there are very different philosophies that folks have in regards to sound reproduction.

    I have heard some very pricey in-wall setups recently:

    Electra IW 1002 - Focal Electra Series White Rectangle In Wall Speaker at Abt

    High performance in-wall and on-wall architectural products and subwoofers with Audyssey Room Correction - Wisdom Audio

    I listened to several movies through quality components. If you are looking for accurate reproduction of what the sound mix was intended it seems unlikely to find anything to beat these and still have a very "clean installation".

    Based on the similarity the midrange and tweeter across the Golden Ear line it is fair to understand why the accuracy / neutrality of all their products have been lauded by numerous reviewers -- GoldenEar Technology Triton Two loudspeaker Page 2 | Stereophile.com Review: Golden Ear Technology Speaker Systems The pricing of the Golden Ear Super Sat series options is little whacky. I believe the step-up to the 60s from the 50s is greater than the total cost of the small Super Sat 3s, which include the same 4 1/2 " mid/bass drivers as well as the folder ribbon which does sorta call into question how much of "loss leader" mindset is driving part of the strategy...

    Personal taste is of course a huge part of why anyone is happy / unhappy with any purchase and I suspect that is even more true with some products than others.

    The Palladium line from Klipsch has also been well reviewed. Given that I assume the OP has spent about $16,000 on a system that includes a pair of P37s, a pair of P17s and a P27 it is odd they are concerned about value priced subs. I don't doubt that there are some rooms where the Palladiums' rear ported design will work as well if not better than other designs.

    The total investment of a pair of Triton Twos and the 60c is less than what a single P37 costs...



    That said it is nice to see folks post their impressions of all the equipment they can.
    Joseph Zgymunt


  4. #4
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    Absolutely.

    So, fortunately I have spent no where near 16k on my set-up. But yes, it had better be a better sounding system for the MSRP!

    I also think that Golden Ear is another good speaker in it's price range no doubt. For me, it turned out to be a little too laid back and the guitars in particular were not as forward as I like. But they are an easy listening speaker that you could listen at high DB's for hours.

    I suppose my biggest caveats for folks looking is that they simply do not have a proper center channel (yet) for the Triton 2's. I would also be a bit leary of a narrow dispersion path on the speakers, and feel that for true HT use that a dedicated sub will be wanted by most. I still feel they are a very nice speaker, but I also feel that the reviews are all so overwhelmingly positive that a potential buyer should be aware of a few shortcomings in my opinion. But, by no means would I say they are bad speakers, in fact I feel they are a very nice sounding speaker (or I wouldn't have dropped close to 5k on them). I sure hope I didn't come off as too negative, just giving some honest opinion of a really nice speaker at it's price point.


    As for value priced subs, no idea what I will do sub wise at this point. Researching things now and debating two solid subs (adding a 2nd to my velodyne spl 1200) or selling that and buying something a bit higher end.

    But at this point, most of the budget is blown!

    Always fun.

  5. #5
    Junior Member 2ndRick's Avatar
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    The powered drivers in the Tritons should only be considered subwoofers in modest systems.

    Think of them more like a hybrid active speaker where there is matched internal amplification for the mid-bass and woofer range, and your receiver (or hopefully separates) are powering the top of the speaker as if it were a satellite speaker that just happens to reside at the top of a tower speaker form factor.

    The benefit there is in being able to easily match the levels of the woofer output based on the room reinforcement (transfer function) of various placements without needing to pull them out away from the rear walls like we would have done with totally passive full range speakers.

    This is similar to the way we *tune* fully active products like Genelec in various applications where the placement needs to be closer to a wall (2 Pi) or even near a wall AND ceiling (1 Pi) where more and more bass reinforcement will alter the sonic character of the speaker at the listening position.

    Here is a link to a Genelec article on this phenomenon.
    Radiation Space in a Room
    Last edited by 2ndRick; 05-23-2013 at 10:40 PM.
    -Rick Murphy
    Naperville, IL

  6. #6
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    Nice link. I am not familiar with the Genelec products (they appear to be Finnish...) but I know the effects of "near wall" placement are often quite a big factor in changing the perceived sound quality. The design of the Golden Ear in-wall and on-wall speakers are some of the better options in their price range. The Triton floor standers hold their own against speakers that are orders of magnitude more costly but every design has limitations...

    I don't doubt there is some separate subwoofer that would be capable of even more extension below the range that the Triton Twos can handle, but in all honesty I think you would end up spending a fortune trying to find something as balanced.
    From The Absolute Sound:
    "The Triton Two handles high
    frequencies via a superb Heil-type
    tweeter, the all-important middle
    frequencies via dual ultra-widebandwidth
    midrange drivers, and the
    low end with a sophisticated 1200-
    watt DSP-controlled subwoofer.
    Together these elements give you
    a slender, full-range floorstander
    that sounds astonishingly refined,
    and offers robust dynamics and
    spectacular 3-D imaging. CM, 214"

    The Absolute Sound Guide to High-Performance Loudspeakers 2012 | The Absolute Sound

    There is really nothing else in the Triton Two price category that has been so well reviewed. Frankly it is increasingly difficult to find ANY true high end speakers that deliver the kind of bottom end that Golden Ear has engineered. It is flat out unfair to call the built-in sub only modest. Results from both Brent Butterworth and HT Labs clearly show what these are capable of --
    Test Report: GoldenEar Technology Triton Two Tower Speakers | Sound and Vision Magazine

    GoldenEar Technology TritonCinema Two HT Labs Measures | Home Theater

    Granted there are some folks that prefer a "punchy" response that includes some midbase kick along with the high pressure low end reinforcement, especially for FX oriented soundtracks but that is neither accurate, nor as Andrew's efforts with true commercial theater setups show, what one is likely to experience even in a professional venue...

    Quote Originally Posted by 2ndRick View Post
    The powered drivers in the Tritons should only be considered subwoofers in modest systems.

    Think of them more like a hybrid active speaker where there is matched internal amplification for the mid-bass and woofer range, and your receiver (or hopefully separates) are powering the top of the speaker as if it were a satellite speaker that just happens to reside at the top of a tower speaker form factor.

    The benefit there is in being able to easily match the levels of the woofer output based on the room reinforcement (transfer function) of various placements without needing to pull them out away from the rear walls like we would have done with totally passive full range speakers.

    This is similar to the way we *tune* fully active products like Genelec in various applications where the placement needs to be closer to a wall (2 Pi) or even near a wall AND ceiling (1 Pi) where more and more bass reinforcement will alter the sonic character of the speaker at the listening position.

    Here is a link to a Genelec article on this phenomenon.
    Radiation Space in a Room
    Last edited by renov8r; 05-24-2013 at 09:47 AM.
    Joseph Zgymunt


  7. #7
    Junior Member 2ndRick's Avatar
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    I have spent a ton of time with these.
    The integrated woofers are *very capable* in extension as well as output.

    They are in a theater demo room at our facility, and we augment them with a single GoldenEar Forcefield 5 sub in that room. Depending on the size of the room, I might have added a second FF5 for some client rooms.

    My point with linking the Genelec article was that the two models at the top of the Triton range are engineered in an active speaker with a variable output that allows us to tailor the response to the room AND the placement to create a very capable full range speaker system.

    Genelecs use a combination of dipswitch settings to offer a smaller number of settings to use in tailoring the response. Triton Two (and Triton Three) have a variable control for more resolution in the response control.

    Back to the OT:
    I am looking forward to the OPs notes on the top range Klipsch models vs the Tritons he owned.
    -Rick Murphy
    Naperville, IL

  8. #8
    Administrator Tracy Rainwater's Avatar
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    I'm seriously thinking about slapping two of the Forcefield Fives in my room.

  9. #9
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    Sure,

    I've had a good week now of really listening to the Palladiums and can do some comparisons if you would like. Primarily 2 channel stereo at this point.

    I also think the post regarding thinking of the Triton 2's (and 3's) as a full range speaker with active woofers is really a better way to view them. In a modest system, they could absolutely fill the role of subwoofer. But, I think that is a really accurate description.

    As for the Klipsch Palladium P37's vs the Triton 2's, again a huge price difference at MSRP.

    The palladiums do not have gobs of low end, the Triton's actually would walk all over them on low end extension and output. Now on the flip side the Palladiums are much, much faster and tighter in the low end.

    I am running dual Velodyne SPL 1200's (sealed 12 inch woofers) crossed over at 60hz with them.

    I will say this, I absolutely LOVE the Palladiums. Strange in that I like bass, but I really am a guitar rock guy and I like a snappy snare drum. The Palladiums are the best rock and roll speaker I have heard through the midrange and top end in my life. A bit forward, but NOT bright like people think of klipsch. They are just spectacular. They also have a much wider dispersion than the Triton 2's. The caveat here is that I need the subwoofers with them (one good sub would be fine but 2 have allowed me to smooth the response and eliminate localization). If I didn't have subs, I'd need to get the bigger palladiums (and the 39's are outrageously priced).

    I've also done a lot of listening to the Paradigm Studio Series and the Klipsch Reference series - both have much more low end than the palladiums, it's not nearly as tight or defined but it's there.

    I actually think the paradigm studio series are brighter than the reference series, but also a bit more detailed on separation of instruments etc.

    But, if there are things you have liked about horns in the past, but things you saw as drawbacks - check out the palladiums.

    I'm actually considering selling mine (the 37's) and trying to get some 38's on demo etc.

    My velodyne subs are pretty musical and tight as sealed 12's and back in the day they were a 1200 dollar or so subwoofer. They are working nicely. I'm also now sold on having 2 subs.

    I'd love to hear the palladiums teamed up with something like a couple rythmik subs as they are really fast and tight. The paradigm sub 12's or jl audio would be nice also, but then we are getting into the stratosphere on pricing.

    The other thing is, like most klipsch speakers, they are effecient. I have a 15 year old plus Harman Kardon signature series amp pushing them and they are plenty loud and clean. Old school harman though. US built, huge power supply etc.


    So, yes, I love these palladiums for me. I had the chance to buy some mint B+W 802's (not the diamonds) and really liked these better.

    So, I found a keeper, unless I can sell them and bump up to the 38's...

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by green giant View Post

    I liked them enough to buy them and drop some serious cash so what happened?

    First of all - As a two channel speaker, sitting in the sweet spot they are a good speaker for the money. The powered subs add nice bass, they image like no tomorrow, and they are not harsh. They can be played loudly without fatigue for sure. They do these things very well and for 3k it's great. I also think this is why the reviews are excellent. In that specific situation and for the money they do a lot of things very well. Most reviewers set things up for that situation. I found though when I moved over even one seat they really changed, much more so than other speakers.

    I wanted the midrange to be more forward, but I'm a rock guy and I want my guitar's crunching.
    Although I have the Triton Threes, it's fortunate to have found this comment, I was having similar feelings with rock music and thought of upgrading to Triton Twos (because of those dual midrange drivers) but I don't think it would've have resolved that.

    My solution is unorthodox, and worked in my case. I connected my 13 years plus old Aiwa Mini HiFi SX-N999 speakers as left, right presence speakers (Yay Yamaha! RX-A840 and Cinema DSP!).

    Signal flow
    Realtek HD (1150) S/PDIF 2 Ch (PCM) --> Yamaha RX-A840 7.1 (Cinema DSP) --> LR: Triton Three, C: SuperSat 50C, LR Presence: Aiwa SX-N999

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