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  1. #1
    Senior Member TrippleJ's Avatar
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    Polk Audio Speakers

    Any thoughts on Polk Audio Speakers?

    Good, bad?

  2. #2
    Administrator Tracy Rainwater's Avatar
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    I really haven't kept up with Polk Audio. Are you looking at their speakers for home theater use?

    I know they used to be fairly big in the auto speaker market.

  3. #3
    Senior Member TrippleJ's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tracy Rainwater View Post
    Are you looking at their speakers for home theater use?
    yes, for home theater.

    I came across their website for in-ceiling speakers and was curious.

  4. #4
    Owner-Publisher Jerry Del Colliano's Avatar
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    I just got a review in for editing. Its a very nice review. Polk makes a fine speaker.

  5. #5
    Banned!!!
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    1 out of 1 members found this post helpful.
    Originally, Polk Audio began in Baltimore Maryland when Matthew Polk started building them in his garage 10 minutes from my house. Originally, they were built right here in Baltimore in Mt. Washington. They grew exponentially. Their Polk 9's got rave reviews back in the day. They sold like hotcakes. They were a passive radiator design.

    If you know anything about passive radiator's, they are not connected electrically, but accoustically. The cabinet design is critical, and this is a very efficient design that requires very little power. The Company had 3 owners: Matthew polk, George Kloffer and Sandy Gross. They did extremely well for about 5 years. Then, they experienced some lean times, and they had to rethink their business model, and tighten their belts. They were still very popular.

    There came a time when the owner's started to drift apart, especially Matthew & Sandy. There were differences of opinions. Sandy really wanted to build Bi Polar speakers;the other's did not. It eventually came to a head, and Sandy left the company and cashed out. Sandy decided that he had a new business plan. He started Definitive Technology. He was brlliant. He decided that he did not want to build the speaker's. Out of his home here in Owings Mills, Maryland he designed the new speaker designs. He decided he would design & engineer them, and he contacted a Piano Company. At this time, Piano's were not exactly selling well. He got them to build his new speaker's. There is an uncanny resemblance between a black piano finish and the piano finish that the piano's were made of. Sandy shipped the speaker's, crossover's etc to them, and they built them

    When you looked at the Def Tech speaker's have that beautiful black piano finish. (what a coincidence.) Everybody was happy. Def Tech took off and did very well. Hell, Sandy had never even been to the piano factory. I knew Sandy at that time, and I did some work in his house. (a long time ago). The polok 10 speaker's were extremely popular and sold for just $199.00 at that time. They were a bargain.

    After Sandy Gross did so well with Definitive Technology, he left to start all over again. Along came Goldenears. Another rocket ship to the stars! Here is the funny part. Matthew Polk sells Polk Audio to D & M holdings ( Denon & Marantz and Boston Acoustics). Matthew cashes out and stays on with D & M. Next, Sandy decides to sell Def Tech. Who did he sell to? D & M holdings! At this point Matthew & Sandy weren't exactly good buddies. Then, they were both working for D & M! It turns out that Sandy Gross became Matthew Polk's boss! This senerio could make for a good movie. They both cashed out and had to work togeather up until Sandy left to start Goldenears. Now isn't that a good nighttime story? Sleep well.

    One last note: WHen Polk was in their prime, it became known that Polk did not make 8 ohm speaker's. They were actually closer to 4 ohm speakers. On the back of most Polk speaker's it said:" compatible with 8 ohm outputs. What the hell does that mean? I confronted Polk for an explanation. They asked me why I wanted to know? That was the wrong answer. However, I figured out why they did that. Every other speaker manufacturer clearly stated their speaker's were 8 ohms. Why did Polk say this (I figured out). They did not want to tell the truth because on the back of most every Audio Receiver it said: Only use with 8 - 16 ohm speakers. Therefore, they were afraid that consumer's would think the Polk's would not be compatible with most Receiver's. Deception at it's finest. Below: check out those Polk Model 10's with dual passive radiators:

    Name:  Polk10Speakers.jpg
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  6. #6
    Senior Member TrippleJ's Avatar
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    Thanks everybody especially Jeff (mrhookup) for the history tour!

    Just to many speakers manufacturer's out there!

    Hard to differentiate the good one's from the bad one's.

  7. #7
    Administrator Tracy Rainwater's Avatar
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    In-ceiling speakers are a bit hard to audition, to say the least.

  8. #8
    Moderator jerrich's Avatar
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    I dearly loved my RTA12's back in the day. They were the 'bomb' of the Polk lineup. That was the model that would do a pretty good job reproducing a square wave signal, very hard to do. The factory even published an oscilloscope picture to prove it. Polk speakers are fine but your own ears will be the ultimate judge, as all speaker sound 'different' imo.
    JR
    I still have a pair of Polk Monitor 5JR+ for my sides in a 6.1 setup.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by jerrich View Post
    I dearly loved my RTA12's back in the day. They were the 'bomb' of the Polk lineup. That was the model that would do a pretty good job reproducing a square wave signal, very hard to do. The factory even published an oscilloscope picture to prove it. Polk speakers are fine but your own ears will be the ultimate judge, as all speaker sound 'different' imo.
    JR
    I still have a pair of Polk Monitor 5JR+ for my sides in a 6.1 setup.
    I believe I had the RTA 12 also for many years. They were "tower" speakers in a great cabinet and a passive woofer or 2. To go along with those I bought some Polk LSI model speakers, center and surrounds. For 6.1 I stuck an axiom in the back of the room.

    Then the wind blew it all away. Tornado in Kansas.

    I loved those Polks.

  10. #10
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    It could have been worse. Before POLK was Polk, the 3 partner's. It could have been Kloffer Speaker's (after George Kloffer, partner). Or it could have been Gross Speakers (after partner, Sandy Gross). I think Polk actually does sound better. Who would own Gross speakers?

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