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  1. #1
    Senior Member Lefisc's Avatar
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    The Return of the Laser Disc Player: The Pioneer Elite LDS-2

    I don’t know the practical definition of “obsolete” anymore.
    If you have a library of 8 track tapes and a machine to play them on are the obsolete?
    Of course if you have the machine and not apes it might as well be.

    My Laser Disc machine, my LDS-2 was returned to me today, finally repaired. I did miss it.

    On a couple of sites I have been told to get rid of the machine, it’s obsolete. Some people who are on these sites believe in only having the newest, which they consider the best. That’s not always good. They were the ones telling em to get rid of all things vinyl when CDs came out, now many of them wish they had kept their records. I did. (well, I kept a lot of them.)

    Some “audiophiles” have the need to keep getting new things, and that is OK if you can afford it./Of course, some sites are sponsored and they encourage to always get new things, whether you want them or really need them.

    The picture quality of DVDs are certainly better than that on Laser, without a doubt. And they pictures have gotten better over the years. And I have replaced every movie I could with a DVD or Blue Ray.

    There are three reasons why I still keep my laser.

    Whenever we go from one technology to the next there are things we leave behind. There are just some records NEVER released on CD. There are many movies and related items released on Laser that have never been released on laser. Not a lot but some. For example, the Godfather Saga (not the trilogy) a 11 hour combination edited in chronological order; The full Betty Boop cartoons, Commentaries by Arthur C Clark on 2001, commentaries on first James Bond movies, and many musical performances by famous musicians.

    I think it surprises people to learn how much better Laser sound was compared to DVDs in many cases. Now Laser sound is mostly 2 channel sound, with CD quality. DVD were multichannel and had the sub-woofer sound, but it was a thinner sound, less detailed and dynamic than laser. Of course, blue meets or exceeds Laser sound.

    And the final reason is that I have a laser machine, the same one I have had since 1990. The LDS-2 has played thousands of hours and gave me great enjoyment, it’s not like I am buying an new one. And why throw out those few dozen discs?

    Sadly, I my player broke about four years ago and my dealer said he could fix it. He gave it to a repair place who lost it (and never told me). They kept saying that I would get it back soon. Well, the called last week when they finally found it and repaired it. The broken piece costs $8, but I had to wait four years. So I hooked it up to my Krell 707 and basically listened to Windom Hill, Linda Ronstadt, Leonard Bernstein and several others. I enjoyed it a lot, although the picture quality was not as good as the sound.
    Barry
    Surround Pre-Amp
    : Krell 707 3D; Amp: (center) Krell 400e; Amp Fronts Krell 600e; SACD: Krell Cipher; FM: Day Sequerra FM Reference; Blu-Ray: Oppo BDP 205; Speakers: Revel Ultima Salon 2; Center: Revel Voice 2; Rear/Back: Thiel Powerplanes/Krell S1500 amp; Subs: 2 SVS SB-13 Ultra; Turntable: VPI 19 Mk 4 w/Tonearm SME 309 & Audioquest 401i; HDTV: Verizon; Projector: JVC DLA-RS66U; Screen: Vue Tech 108; Internet Radio: Sonos; Remote: MX850; Pioneer Elite LDS-2 Laser Disc

  2. #2


    I'm all for upgrading to better sound and video, when it makes sense. However, if you have titles that can not be had on the newer formats, keep on Rockin' the Laser Disc.

    If you can find some way to convert its video output to HDMI, run it into your Oppo's front panel HDMI input. The Oppo will scale the video to 1080p and it will most likely be the best your LD collection has ever looked.

  3. #3
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    Lefisc: I am one that agrees with you. I still have several top Pioneer Laser Disc Players (they still work great, and a huge library of the discs. I could print them out if you are interested. I still enjoy some of them and sometimes I record some for friends onto DVD. Not the highest quality, but still pretty damn good. Like you said;

    I couldn't buy much of this on DVD or Blu Ray. Some of it is rare or contains much more material then what is available on the other formats. One day I will buy a Blu Ray recorder (although the blank Blu Ray discs are still expensive). I have a dubbing center set up in my office. I can go from DVD > DVD; Laser Disc > DVD; VHS > DVD. Why from VHS? Because some people still want that stuff converted to DVD. When I get a Blu Ray Recorder, it will simply add more options. I am leaning towards a stand alone Blu Ray recorder; not a burner that is in my computer. Anyone have a suggestion on a good stand alone Blu Ray burner? I'm all ears.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Lefisc's Avatar
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    Tracy, the Krell 707 boasts it to a 1080p, but it is till nowhere as good as a DVD. Jeff, sadly i have no idea what a good burner would be. What atre some of your discs?
    Barry
    Surround Pre-Amp
    : Krell 707 3D; Amp: (center) Krell 400e; Amp Fronts Krell 600e; SACD: Krell Cipher; FM: Day Sequerra FM Reference; Blu-Ray: Oppo BDP 205; Speakers: Revel Ultima Salon 2; Center: Revel Voice 2; Rear/Back: Thiel Powerplanes/Krell S1500 amp; Subs: 2 SVS SB-13 Ultra; Turntable: VPI 19 Mk 4 w/Tonearm SME 309 & Audioquest 401i; HDTV: Verizon; Projector: JVC DLA-RS66U; Screen: Vue Tech 108; Internet Radio: Sonos; Remote: MX850; Pioneer Elite LDS-2 Laser Disc

  5. #5


    Quote Originally Posted by Lefisc View Post
    I don’t know the practical definition of “obsolete” anymore.
    If you have a library of 8 track tapes and a machine to play them on are the obsolete?
    Of course if you have the machine and not apes it might as well be.\
    I would say obsolete means that it has been replaced by a superior version. LaserDiscs were cool for their time and may have unique content, but the tech has been replaced by much better versions.

    I *do* have 8-Tracks, and listen to them from time to time, but more out of nostalgia than anything else. They're probably the most durable audio format ever. But they sound like crap.

    Obsolete could also mean that nobody is producing them and/or content for them.

    Regardless, even though I did love LaserDiscs back in the day, having to flip them was a drag. I do not miss that-

  6. #6
    Senior Member k0rww's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrhookup View Post
    When I get a Blu Ray Recorder, it will simply add more options. I am leaning towards a stand alone Blu Ray recorder; not a burner that is in my computer. Anyone have a suggestion on a good stand alone Blu Ray burner? I'm all ears.
    The best Blu-ray writer used to be Pioneer but they seem to gotten out of the business. I have used many Asus Blu-ray writers but not external ones.

    My choice would be: ASUS USB 3.0 12X Blu-ray Burner Model BW-12D1S-U/BLK/G/AS

    ASUS Model BW-12D1S-U/BLK/G/AS Black 12X Blu-ray Burner - Newegg.com

    It doesn't say whether it's USB2.0 backward compatible however.
    Richard

  7. #7


    Quote Originally Posted by Brandon Eberhart View Post

    Regardless, even though I did love LaserDiscs back in the day, having to flip them was a drag. I do not miss that-
    The later models didn't need to be flipped, but it was only on the higher-end models.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Lefisc's Avatar
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    Actually Tracy, I found it hard to flip the models so I decided to turn over the discs instead.
    Barry
    Surround Pre-Amp
    : Krell 707 3D; Amp: (center) Krell 400e; Amp Fronts Krell 600e; SACD: Krell Cipher; FM: Day Sequerra FM Reference; Blu-Ray: Oppo BDP 205; Speakers: Revel Ultima Salon 2; Center: Revel Voice 2; Rear/Back: Thiel Powerplanes/Krell S1500 amp; Subs: 2 SVS SB-13 Ultra; Turntable: VPI 19 Mk 4 w/Tonearm SME 309 & Audioquest 401i; HDTV: Verizon; Projector: JVC DLA-RS66U; Screen: Vue Tech 108; Internet Radio: Sonos; Remote: MX850; Pioneer Elite LDS-2 Laser Disc

  9. #9


    Some of the players were quite heavy.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Lefisc's Avatar
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    But seriously folks:

    In the mid 1980s VCRs, mostly VHS (but I had a beta) dominated the market for “home theatre.” The pictures were poor, worse than broadcast TV. The sound was monaural and the concept of lettering boxing was not common. Further, none of the movies available on tape were what we today called “remastered.” In other words the actual print was often awful. And tapes, before the rentals began often cost up to $100.

    Yes, Laser needed to be turned over, but Laser Discs came out BEFORE CDs and records had to be turned over so it was the usual practice, it was nothing out of the ordinary. Lasers were the first to begin to give us the common features we expect today, commentaries, deleted scenes, alternative endings and, of course, stereo. Sadly, for their first decade, the Lasers came out months after the Video Tape, they weren’t “day and date” until the early 1990s.

    Movies on tape were often time compressed so that an entire movie could fit on a 2 hour cassette. In the beginning, so were Lasers. For example, Star Wars was compressed so that the 121 minute movie fit on two one hour dies. It was worse with other movies that were a tad longer.

    But at the time Lasers were the best thing out there, but they never really coaught on big time.
    Barry
    Surround Pre-Amp
    : Krell 707 3D; Amp: (center) Krell 400e; Amp Fronts Krell 600e; SACD: Krell Cipher; FM: Day Sequerra FM Reference; Blu-Ray: Oppo BDP 205; Speakers: Revel Ultima Salon 2; Center: Revel Voice 2; Rear/Back: Thiel Powerplanes/Krell S1500 amp; Subs: 2 SVS SB-13 Ultra; Turntable: VPI 19 Mk 4 w/Tonearm SME 309 & Audioquest 401i; HDTV: Verizon; Projector: JVC DLA-RS66U; Screen: Vue Tech 108; Internet Radio: Sonos; Remote: MX850; Pioneer Elite LDS-2 Laser Disc

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