Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    Administrator Tracy Rainwater's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    17,939


    4K Content You Can Enjoy Today

    Name:  Screen shot 2015-07-02 at 12.17.21 PM.jpg
Views: 297
Size:  9.7 KB

    So you went out and bought yourself a new 4K display, or you are thinking about it. The recent announcement from the Blu-ray Disc Association about a finalized spec for the Ultra HD Blu-ray disc is good news. However, who knows when we will see Ultra HD discs for sale?

    Luckily, there is some 4K content out there today. HomeTheaterReview.com's Adrienne Maxwell has just posted an article outlining some content options. They range from Amazon Instant Video and Netflix to a few lesser known sources.

    Check out Adreinne's story here, What 4K Content Can You Enjoy Right Now?

  2. #2
    Senior Member NoUDont's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    1,507


    Tracy, what they are basically saying is that there isnt any content available. i know about early adopting, but this 4k fiasco is pretty outrageous. selling a bunch of tv's with loops of insects and waterfalls u can watch...and curved screen to boot! is pretty sad.

    then the majority of what u can watch has be streamed to u, which means u are not getting full bandwidth 100% pure 4k.

    the good thing about being an early adopter is knowing when not to...i'll wait

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Lansdowne, VA, USA
    Posts
    96


    The article covers well the 4K content possibilities and the evaluation of the content quality of 4K downloaded vs. streamed, and also compared to Blu-ray up scaled to 4K. I experienced similarly with the 4K players of Sony and Nuvola over the past 3 years.


    4K download vs. streaming did not show a day and night difference (I have a 100Mbps internet line), which in theory should show a clear visual improvement considering that Sony's selling point of downloading is that is less compressed than streaming, but ironically, neither is better than Blu-ray upscaled by my 4K projector on a 10-feet wide screen, in my opinion due to a higher play back Mbps speed from the disc and a great upscaling video processor in the projector.


    I agree with the general feeling expressed by this poster regarding not to be in a hurry for a 4K display if 4K content is used as the motivator, but he would then not be an early adopter, he would follow the crowd when all the dust settles, and get lower pricing, from the economies of scale and R&D efficiencies, courtesy of the high pricing paid by the actual early adopters, and that is fine as well.


    We have to remember that when HDTV started in Nov 1998 there were only a couple of million sets sold over the first 3 years, very few sets compared to the 4K sales now on the same initial period, and there was not much HD content for the first years, such as a few 30-minute 1080i video loops from PBS and satellite's HDNet many may remember, which we all treasured back then.


    Most early adopters bought their expensive HDTV ($5K and up on 1998 dollars), mostly 50-70 inches RPTVs with 3-CRT guns, to see in better glory their widescreen DVDs upscaled to 1080i, and thinner top/bottom black bars on CinemaScope movies, following the same motivation movie and quality video fans had with widescreen laser discs shown on 16x9 NTSC RPTVs a few years earlier.


    It took 8 years for the Blu-ray HD pre-recorded content to appear in 2006, and comparatively, the 4K Blu-ray Disc is coming in less than half of that time after the appearance of the first 4K displays.


    In other words, buyers of large screen 4K sets and projectors can and are doing similarly, and the existence of 4K content now is not and should not be the main driver of a purchase considering how spectacular a Blu-ray upscaled to 4K looks, and a true 4K Blu-ray disc planned by year-end is expected to show even better.


    The purchaser of a 4K display should rather make sure the chosen display is at a minimum HDMI 2.0, HDCP 2.2 compliant; and, if the buyer is looking for some known future-readiness features, it would be better if the display is also capable of handling HDR, better than Rec. 709 HDTV color gamut (preferably Rec. 2020 color gamut), 10-bit color depth and 60fps 4K input acceptance and internal handling.


    The arrival of 4K Blu-ray in a few months will inject the market with a large motivator for 4K display purchases, regardless of how less-impressive most 4K downloads/streaming look today, and hopefully those 4K internet solutions may find themselves in need to improve when people start seeing a 4K Blu-ray on its expected glory.


    Best Regards,

    Rodolfo La Maestra




  4. #4
    Senior Member NoUDont's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    1,507


    "It took 8 years for the Blu-ray HD pre-recorded content to appear in 2006, and comparatively, the 4K Blu-ray Disc is coming in less than half of that time after the appearance of the first 4K displays."

    1080p tv's were available in 1998?

    the up scaling for blu ray is intriguing. I love what my 1080p tv does with 1080i and 720p content.

    Btw I found ur summary and info in ur post better than the article.

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Lansdowne, VA, USA
    Posts
    96


    Quote Originally Posted by NoUDont View Post
    "It took 8 years for the Blu-ray HD pre-recorded content to appear in 2006, and comparatively, the 4K Blu-ray Disc is coming in less than half of that time after the appearance of the first 4K displays."

    1080p tv's were available in 1998?

    the up scaling for blu ray is intriguing. I love what my 1080p tv does with 1080i and 720p content.

    Btw I found ur summary and info in ur post better than the article.
    Actually "1080i "TVs were made available when HDTV was broadcasted in Nov 1998, not 1080p of the panels we have now. I paid $8000 for a 58" Pioneer Elite TV back then, which was the quality to beat for years, as their Kuro plasma panels later were as well, and still are in my mind, and in my house.

    Moreover, in a preferential move to manufacturers rather than consumers, 4x3 digital TVs were also allowed by the then CEMA (today's CEA) to use the name HDTV even when their vertical resolution for the actual 16x9 HD image, a rectangular image shown in a squarish TV frame, was only about 800 lines, not 1080, due to their squarish cabinet/screen format.

    What I criticized for years was that although it was known that HDTV would be introduced toward the end of 1998, after 20 years in the making, DVD was still allowed to be introduced as 480i video just 2 years earlier in 1996 rather than trying to sync the resolution format of prerecorded media with the resolution format of about to be released display devices, and history shows that the matching disc format (Blu-ray) arrived 8 years after the HDTVs that were able to display it.

    Fortunately the now 3-4 years waiting period of 4k Blu-ray after 4K TVs is becoming shorter, but again we started to entertain the idea of 8K displays even before the 4K disc is about to be released.

    The upscaling of a 4K TV/projector from a 1080p Blu-ray is mathematically more accurate than what your HDTV does with 1080i or 720p sources, because the 4K display doubles pixels evenly horizontally and vertically maintaining the same pixel mapping (1080x1920 evenly upscaled to 2160x3840) and not altering the frame rate cadence.

    But still, the current 1080i (TV and disc concerts recorded by video cameras) and 24fps frame rate (movies from film) conversions to 1080p and 60-120fps display rates of typical HDTV sets have become acceptable to unsuspected viewers, in part for implementing pull-down techniques that do their best to make a 24fps film source be displayed on a 30fps video cadence (inventing the extra 6 frames at display time), actually displayed as 60-120-240fps video frame rates with more modern sets by simple frame repetition or pixel interpolated frames to smooth out fast action imaging.

    Thanks for your appreciation of the content of my post, although the information I provided is different and historical in no way was intended to detract from the good effort Addrienne has made on her article, much needed article indeed.

    Best Regards,

    Rodolfo La Maestra

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Luxury Publishing Group Inc.
15332 Antioch Street | Pacific Palisades, CA 90272 | 310.860.9988
©2011 Luxury Publishing Group. All Rights Reserved
For our Privacy Poliicy, ad specs and contact
info please click here