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  1. #1


    Laser Disc Player

    I work at a school and while cleaning out the shed found a brand new unopened Laser Disc Player (Pioneer CLD-V2400). I opened it and retrieved the packing slip and it was bought by our school in 1994 for $868! Talk about a blast from the past. I am trying to figure out how to sell it. I did a search on Craig's List/E-bay for comparison values but there is nothing out there new. Anyone have any idea of the best place to see if there is any interest in something like this? Thanks for any suggestions!

  2. #2


    First off, welcome to HomeTheaterEquipment.com.

    These days, they aren't really worth much unless you can find someone with a LD collection. I know we have a couple of guys here that have some. Really, Ebay and Craigslist may be your best bet to sell it. There's Augiogon.com, but I don't know if it would sell there.

    Looking up the model number, it seems to be a commercial model. Built rugged to sell to schools and other commercial applications.

  3. #3
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    I happen to have a pretty large collection of Laser Discs. I was a fan since the '80's. The previous format: VCR. Laser disc had a lot of advantages at the time. VCR: resolution: 240 LOR. Laser disc: 420 LOR. Laser disc: LD: no macrovision, easy recording. If you have little or no LD discs, no sense. I still have 3 Laser disc players that work fine. Two are Pioneer higher end models. The third is a Zenith. The content on LD is mostly much more content then their DVD counterpart.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Lefisc's Avatar
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    Having a laser Disc player, the Pioneer LDS-2, I wanted to give some insight here, but really can't. Laser Discs are not like Vinyl which many people still have and prefer over CDs. Frankly, I had a ton of Lasers but they have been replaced by DVDs and Blu Rays because they are FAR superior. Although the two channel fidelity of Lasers often was better than that of DVDS, but not of blu rays.

    I keep my LDS-@ because I have no reason to throw it out and because I have a handful of Lasers that have not been put out as DVDs. That's a bit misleading. I have a 2001 Laser and three James Bonds whose bonus material have not been duplicated. And a collection of the complete Betty Boops that has not been duplicated either. In my experience, however, few people want these machines and for a new one like the one you have, a listing on ebay may be the best. $100 may be the top price, but being new and not used, you could get closer to $200, but I doubt it.
    Barry
    Surround Pre-Amp
    : Krell 707 3D; Amp: (center) Krell 400e; Amp Fronts Krell 600e; SACD: Krell Cipher; FM: Day Sequerra FM Reference; Blu-Ray: Oppo BDP 205; Speakers: Revel Ultima Salon 2; Center: Revel Voice 2; Rear/Back: Thiel Powerplanes/Krell S1500 amp; Subs: 2 SVS SB-13 Ultra; Turntable: VPI 19 Mk 4 w/Tonearm SME 309 & Audioquest 401i; HDTV: Verizon; Projector: JVC DLA-RS66U; Screen: Vue Tech 108; Internet Radio: Sonos; Remote: MX850; Pioneer Elite LDS-2 Laser Disc

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    Barry: I disagree with you on one point you made. The resolution on regular DVD is not superior in resolution over Laser disc. Both formats: around 420 LOR. How then is DVD superior?

  6. #6
    Senior Member Lefisc's Avatar
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    Jeff, don't want to argue but thei picture on my DVD is superior to that of the laser. I played several movies and compared. The DVD was better. Honest!
    Barry
    Surround Pre-Amp
    : Krell 707 3D; Amp: (center) Krell 400e; Amp Fronts Krell 600e; SACD: Krell Cipher; FM: Day Sequerra FM Reference; Blu-Ray: Oppo BDP 205; Speakers: Revel Ultima Salon 2; Center: Revel Voice 2; Rear/Back: Thiel Powerplanes/Krell S1500 amp; Subs: 2 SVS SB-13 Ultra; Turntable: VPI 19 Mk 4 w/Tonearm SME 309 & Audioquest 401i; HDTV: Verizon; Projector: JVC DLA-RS66U; Screen: Vue Tech 108; Internet Radio: Sonos; Remote: MX850; Pioneer Elite LDS-2 Laser Disc

  7. #7


    Laser Disc and DVD are "about" the same resolution but how the video is output can make a difference.

    Most Laser Disc players that I have seen are composite video and a few have S-Video. There may be others, but this is what I have seen.
    Most DVD players are S-Video, at a minimum, with many having component video or even HDMI.

    I don't think anyone would say that composite video would be a better quality signal, and S-Video isn't much better.

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    Barry: After you read this, you will see why LD is actually superior to DVD, which is now obsolete. If you still feel the DVD looks superior, either, you need a new eye glass prescription, or it's the placebo effect (you per
    My two Pioneer LD Players model numbers: CLD- D3070 (Digital Optical Output). CLD-D701 ( Two Sided Play; Time Base Correction [Stabilizes the Video: Rock solid], Digital Optical Output).

    LaserDisc players can provide a great degree of control over the playback process. Unlike many DVD players, the transport mechanism always obeys commands from the user: pause, fast-forward, and fast-reverse commands are always accepted (barring, of course, malfunctions). There were no "User Prohibited Options" where content protection code instructs the player to refuse commands to skip a specific part (such as fast forwarding through copyright warnings). (Some DVD players, particularly higher-end units, do have the ability to ignore the blocking code and play the video without restrictions, but this feature is not common in the usual consumer market.)

    With CAV LaserDiscs the user can jump directly to any individual frame of a video simply by entering the frame number on the remote keypad, a feature not common among DVD players. Some DVD players have cache features which stores a certain amount of the video in RAM which allows the player to index a DVD as quickly as an LD, even down to the frame in some players.

    Damaged spots on a LaserDisc can be played through or skipped over, while a DVD will often become unplayable past the damage. Some newer DVD players feature a repair+skip algorithm, which alleviates this problem by continuing to play the disc, filling in unreadable areas of the picture with blank space or a frozen frame of the last readable image and sound. The success of this feature depends upon the amount of damage. LaserDisc players, when working in full analog, recover from such errors faster than DVD players. Direct comparison here is almost impossible due to the sheer size differences between the two media. A 1 in (3 cm) scratch on a DVD will probably cause more problems than a 1 in (3 cm) scratch on a LaserDisc, but a fingerprint taking up 1% of the area of a DVD would almost certainly cause fewer problems than a similar mark covering 1% of the surface of a LaserDisc.[citation needed]

    Similar to the CD versus LP sound quality debates common in the audiophile community, some videophiles argue that LaserDisc maintains a "smoother", more "film-like", natural image while DVD still looks slightly more artificial. Early DVD demo discs often had compression or encoding problems, lending additional support to such claims at the time. However, the video signal-to-noise ratio and bandwidth of LaserDisc are substantially less than that of DVDs, making DVDs appear sharper and clearer to most viewers.

    Another advantage, at least to some consumers, was the lack of any sort of anti-piracy technology. It was claimed that Macrovision's Copyguard protection could not be applied to LaserDisc, due to the format's design. The vertical blanking interval, where the Macrovision signal would be implemented, was also used for the internal timing on LaserDisc players, so test discs with Macrovision would not play at all. There was never a push to redesign the format despite the obvious potential for piracy due to its relatively small market share. The industry simply decided to engineer it into the DVD specification.

    LaserDisc's support for multiple audio tracks allowed for vast supplemental materials to be included on-disc and made it the first available format for "Special Edition" releases; the 1984 Criterion Collection edition of Citizen Kane is generally credited as being the first "Special Edition" release to home video,[citation needed] and for setting the standard by which future SE discs were measured. The disc provided interviews, commentary tracks, documentaries, still photographs, and other features for historians and collectors.

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    Well, Here it is; my entire Laser Disc Collection:

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  10. #10
    Senior Member Lefisc's Avatar
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    Jeffrey,

    While many of your posts are informative and helpful, you’re too often personal attacks have been offensive and rude.

    After reading your first paragraph, I had no need to go further. Rude people, like you, are not people that one can have a discussion with. So I won’t.
    Barry
    Surround Pre-Amp
    : Krell 707 3D; Amp: (center) Krell 400e; Amp Fronts Krell 600e; SACD: Krell Cipher; FM: Day Sequerra FM Reference; Blu-Ray: Oppo BDP 205; Speakers: Revel Ultima Salon 2; Center: Revel Voice 2; Rear/Back: Thiel Powerplanes/Krell S1500 amp; Subs: 2 SVS SB-13 Ultra; Turntable: VPI 19 Mk 4 w/Tonearm SME 309 & Audioquest 401i; HDTV: Verizon; Projector: JVC DLA-RS66U; Screen: Vue Tech 108; Internet Radio: Sonos; Remote: MX850; Pioneer Elite LDS-2 Laser Disc

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