Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 16 of 16
  1. #11
    Senior Member David Vaughn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Northern, CA
    Posts
    13,328


    1 out of 1 members found this post helpful.
    Oh yeah...one other thing...Mic Drop!!!
    David Vaughn
    Technical Writer/Blu-ray Reviewer
    Sound and Vision Magazine

  2. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    283


    1 out of 1 members found this post helpful.
    Wonderfully clear thinking Dave, and the tax bill has a long way to go till passage. And lets not forget the Republican's ability to snatch defeat from the jaws of victory. I had to laugh at Jerry's comment too, he's "low level" in the 1%. LOL. He never misses a chance to pat himself on the back. I'm sure no one here is shedding any crocodile tears.
    Last edited by jive420; 11-07-2017 at 03:04 PM.

  3. #13
    Senior Member David Vaughn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Northern, CA
    Posts
    13,328


    According to this article, I'm not even in the Top 10% and I make a pretty good living. If Jerry's in the Top 1% (per these numbers), he needs to pay his fair share (according to the Democrats):

    How Much Income Puts You in the Top 1%, 5%, 10%?

    By Rebecca Lake | September 15, 2016 — 3:58 PM EDT SHARE






    Incomes have been making news this week. But when you read all those stories about the 5% or the storied 1% – or even the top 10% – how much money do you need to pull in to be in one of those groups? Here's the answer.

    ​The discussion started when the U.S. Census Bureau released data which showed that median household incomes increased 5.2% between 2014 and 2015. The announcement made headlines because it was the first significant jump in earnings reported since the 2007 pre-Recession era (see Incomes Jump, Says Census. Who's Doing Best?) .

    According to the Bureau’s 2015 Income, Poverty and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States report, incomes grew across the board in 2015. Those at the lower end of the income scale saw their pay increases, as did those pulling in six-figure paydays.

    Among the top 5% of earners, median household incomes climbed by 0.9%. While that boost seems small compared to the 1.9% increase reported among the bottom fifth of all earners, it means that it takes an even bigger paycheck to make it into the relatively small club of Americans who draw the largest salaries.
    How Much Do You Need?


    The top 5% of households earn an annual income of $214,462 or higher, according to the Census Bureau. That’s nearly four times the 2015 nationwide median household income of $56,516. The average income among those in the top 5% climbed to $350,870. Overall, this group lays claim to a 22.1% share of total household income in the U.S. Source:
    To be certified as a one-percenter, you’ll need to bring in even more income each year. According to statistical data from the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), the top 1% had an adjusted gross income of $465,626 or higher for the 2014 tax year. The Washington Center for Equitable Growth put the average household income for this group at $1,260,508 for 2014.

    If you want to cross the top 10% mark, you’ll still need a six-figure income but the numbers aren’t quite as high. The IRS sets the adjusted gross income cutoff required to be in the 10% group at $133,445, based on 2014 tax data. Once again, the average household income for the top 10% of earners is higher, at $295,845.


    Net Worth Grows, Too

    Rising median income is paralleled by an increase in household net worth. Between 2014 and 2015, household net worth rose by 3.6%, according to the Federal Reserve. Collectively, Americans controlled $88.1 trillion in assets through the first quarter of 2016. The gains in income and in net worth can be viewed as evidence of how the economy is continuing its steady recovery nearly a decade after the financial crisis began in December 2007.









    Read more: How Much Income Puts You in the Top 1%, 5%, 10%? | Investopedia https://www.investopedia.com/news/ho...#ixzz4xmnmfVIO
    Follow us: Investopedia on Facebook
    David Vaughn
    Technical Writer/Blu-ray Reviewer
    Sound and Vision Magazine

  4. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    283


    I found this. Here they break down one percenter's by state.

    https://www.cnbc.com/2017/06/12/how-...-us-state.html

  5. #15


    Quote Originally Posted by jive420 View Post
    I found this. Here they break down one percenter's by state.

    https://www.cnbc.com/2017/06/12/how-...-us-state.html
    I was going to mention that salary alone doesn't mean everything. The cost of living plays a big part of if you are a 1%'er in your state.

    I know here in my state, you can buy yourself a pretty nice house for $200K, less really. However, in much of California, $200K is a shack, or is from what I have seen. Salaries are also much higher in some states.

  6. #16
    Senior Member moomoomoomoo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Washington State
    Posts
    483


    I didn't realize we had a politics thread. Everything about Tramp & the Republicons is screwing us, imo.
    Passive Preamp: Mod Squad Deluxe; Amp McCormack DNA-1 Mod 1; Hi Rez & blu-ray/DVD Front End: Oppo BDP-95 With Region Hack; CD front end: Esoteric P-10->Kimber/Illuminati Digital Cable-> PS Audio SL3; CD Recorder: Tascam 900SL; Cassette Deck: Nakamichi DR2; Speakers (2.0): NHT 2.5I; Analog Cable: Tara Analog Standard, Pandora & Omni Bi-Wired Speaker Cable; Various aftermarket power cords; Power Conditioner: Adcom, Televsion: Vizio E55-C1

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Luxury Publishing Group Inc.
15332 Antioch Street | Pacific Palisades, CA 90272 | 310.860.9988
©2011 Luxury Publishing Group. All Rights Reserved
For our Privacy Poliicy, ad specs and contact
info please click here